Keeping Your Forest Soils Healthy and Productive

Keeping Your Forest Soils Healthy and Productive

EB2019
Download PDF
Ole Helgerson, Richard Miller
This publication is designed for non-industrial private forest landowners in Washington State. It includes background on the fundamentals of good forest soil stewardship to maintain productive forests, including forest soil development and characteristics (e.g., nutrients, texture, organic matter), fire effects, management practices that enhance soil and water quality, and how to obtain and use USDA soil survey data. Also provided are a glossary of forest soil terminology, references for further reading, and 24 illustrations.
Section 3 Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Mauris sit amet pulvinar massa, vel suscipit turpis. Vestibulum sollicitudin felis sit amet mi luctus, sed malesuada nibh ultricies. Nam sit amet accumsan dui, vitae placerat tortor. Vestibulum facilisis fermentum dignissim. Maecenas ultrices cursus diam, eu volutpat urna viverra non.

Page:

...

Why forest soils are important to you

Soils are an integral structural part of your woodland and the larger forest ecosystem. Important forest soil functions include:

  • Providing water, nutrients, and physical support for the growth of trees and other forest plants
  • Allowing an exchange of carbon dioxide, oxygen, and other gasses that affect root growth and soil organisms
  • Providing a substrate for organisms linked with vital ecosystem processes
  • Harboring root diseases and other pests
  • Affecting water quantity and quality

Thus, how you protect and manage forest soils affects your for­est’s short- and long-term productivity and the water quality of adjoining streams and lakes, including their suitability for fish habitat and other uses.

This publication will provide you with:

  • An understanding of soil characteristics important to wood­land management
  • Management practices for maintaining and enhancing soil quality
  • A guide for obtaining soil-specific information from USDA soil surveys
  • A list of useful references
  • A glossary of forest soil terminology

Page:

...

Copyright 2008 Washington State University

Published April, 2008

WSU Extension bulletins contain material written and produced for public distribution. Alternate formats of our educational materials are available upon request for persons with disabilities. Please contact Washington State University Extension for more information

Issued by Washington State University Extension and the U.S. Department of Agriculture in furtherance of the Acts of May 8 and June 30, 1914. Extension programs and policies are consistent with federal and state laws and regulations on nondiscrimination regarding race, sex, religion, age, color, creed, and national or ethnic origin; physical, mental, or sensory disability; marital status or sexual orientation; and status as a Vietnam-era or disabled veteran. Evidence of noncompliance may be reported through your local WSU Extension office. Trade names have been used to simplify information; no endorsement is intended.